Free Swan Researcher Workshops with WWT Welney

logosWould you like to become a trained volunteer with the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust? Look no further!

 

As part of the WWT Welney Wetlands Centre’s project within the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnerships scheme, called ‘Species Identification & Monitoring’, a series of workshops are now being organised so that you can also become a trained swan researcher – join the WWT Welney at 21 or 22 November:

Capture

Or download the poster here: Swan ring reading workshop 1

 

Related posts:

 

Advertisements

Tales of Washes, Wildfowl and Water

Volunteers needed

One of the projects of the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership is well underway and very keen to recruit more young volunteers to help make a short, animated film all about the creation of the Ouse Washes.

The details of who is eligible and how to get involved:Rosmini animation project A5flier jpeg

The film will be all about the archaeology, landscape heritage, natural heritage and the people who created the landscape and worked in the washes; it will lead those involved to explore the landscape heritage and how the Ouse Washes were created.

The Project

logos

The project is being run by the Fens Museum Partnership, in conjunction with a local volunteer community group linked to the Rosmini Centre in Wisbech. The volunteers involved in the project will shape the story and direction of the film, select the topics and then put the film together, thereby gaining a great sense of ownership over the project and final product.

Once the Ouse Washes Partnership scheme has completed its work, this film will continue to be used by various organisations, for example schools, youth clubs, libraries, local history groups and community groups, providing a concise story of the Ouse Washes to many more people and allowing them to learn about its heritage.

We will also promote the film at many of our partnership events, such as the Festival Fortnight during July 2015 and 2016, and other occasions when we showcase the Ouse Washes scheme to the public.

Previous films from the Fens Museum Partnership

To give you an idea of the wonderful films that are put together using this technique, follow this link to see some films that are part of a series of short, stop-frame animation Fenland Storiesfilms entitled Fenland Stories previously produced by The Fens Museum Partnership.

Once again, on this project, the film will be produced as a packaged DVD, allowing it to be widely distributed to the scheme partners, the Heritage Lottery Fund and other organisations. It will also be uploaded to the scheme’s website, social media and our YouTube channel.

How to Get Involved

If you are interested in getting involved in the project, please get in touch with Ruth Farnan at the Fens Museum Partnership directly on:

  • 07881 924374, or
  • ruth.farnan@Norfolk.gov.uk

Or you can contact the central team for the partnership using the details on our contact page.

Starting my volunteer summer placement…

logosHello, I am Emily Stacey and I have just begun a Volunteer Summer Placement with Cambridgeshire ACRE working on both The Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership and The Water Care Partnership. Having always lived in a rural area I have a great passion for our local countryside and am strongly supportive of the conservation of its unique wildlife and habitats. This summer I graduated from the University of Reading with a degree in Physical Geography. I now dream of a career in environmental management where I can play an active role in promoting the importance of the environment as well as work closely with communities.

???????????????????????????????

The Old Bedford River at the RSPB Ouse Washes reserve. Images by Sheils Flynn for OWLP.

Alongside my position at Cambridgeshire ACRE I work for the National Trust at Wimpole Hall Estate where conservation of the property, land and the ‘Spirit of Wimpole’ is a key priority. With significant background in public interaction I believe this placement is a great opportunity for me to gain the relative experience I need to build my CV, and utilise the knowledge I have gained throughout my study.

My time at Reading…

At University I was able to shape my study to attain fundamental knowledge to support my interests in conservation, biodiversity and sustainable practices. I extremely enjoyed the practical side of my course including the opportunities to visit diverse areas of the UK including the Lake District and Pembrokeshire where sustainable land use was a key focus. Travelling to the Akamas Natura 2000 Conservation Area of Cyprus was a highlight and I was able to explore the vast landscape and learn about the continuing conflicts in land development experienced between developing interests of the local people and conservation interests of environmentalists.

???????????????????????????????

Cattle grazing causing bank erosion along the Ely Ouse.

My participation in such trips has not only allowed me to develop skills in data collection and surveys but also enabled me to experience the expansive habitats that our planet has to offer. Furthermore having worked closely with agricultural students on joint modules and through the University of Reading Agricultural Society my interest for sustainable land management and farming practices has grown.

My personal research project…

Like projects within both partnerships my final year dissertation took on aspects of land management. Through assessment of phosphate and nitrate concentrations along a stretch of the River Cam I developed an understanding of the effect of sewage discharge and agricultural input on the water quality.

???????????????????????????????

Typical Fen IDB Drainage Ditch

Primary data illustrated significant variation in river concentrations with changing land use. I found sewage effluents to have a particularly noticeable influence on phosphate loads which is a key issue that has arisen in the Old Bedford and Middle Level catchment covered by The Water Care Partnership. Furthermore through communication with Cambridge Water I was able to obtain groundwater nutrient concentrations from which I concluded elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater to reflect the occurrence of landfill sites, both Historic and Authorised.

My study also investigated aspects of biodiversity. By method of percentage cover I aimed to understand the effect of water quality on the species present. With my previous study and experience relating to aims and interests of The Water Care Partnership I recognise this placement to be hugely valuable for my progression and interests.

My first few weeks here…

Within the few weeks of my placement I have already had the opportunity to attend meetings at the Brampton Environment Agency Office where I have developed deeper understanding of the projects underway and the issues the organisation is up against. Furthermore I now fully understand the importance of the creation of partnerships in enabling smooth interaction and clear communication between groups as well as in making full use of valuable local knowledge.

Summer walk

Summer Walk at WWT Welney Reserve

Although enjoying the office based tasks I have undertaken I am excited for the chance to venture out of the office and to assist in the organised walks, aimed at educating people on the issues arising within the Ouse Washes. With the Fenland landscape very different from my local area in Hertfordshire I want to get involved in the local community of the OWLP area and enjoy the wide range of habitats and wildlife, identifying the native species as well as fenland non-native species that I have already learnt to be a current issue. I believe this placement is going to be a valuable experience and a great learning curve. I look forward to meeting more of the partners involved in the partnerships and the opportunity to play a practical role in the progression of current projects.

My future aims…

Having thoroughly enjoyed my degree course I aim for a career where I can use the knowledge and skills I have attained. Along the way I developed a deep interest in the environmental impacts of land use and measures taken to tackle these whilst ensuring benefit to all stakeholders. In turn conservation and land management is the route I want to follow.

Interaction with people is of huge importance to me and is a strong personal skill of mine. Therefore I would love my future career to feature great involvement with communities as well as work within a close-knit team.

Summer placement volunteer started!

LogosHello, I am Lizzie Bannister and I am a new volunteer working for the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership on a summer placement, which is a great way to get back into the environmental sector and make use of what I learnt during my degrees in conservation studies. I enjoyed working hard on Wicken Fen National Nature Reserve and Hinchingbrooke Country Park in past summers so this office-based landscape project management work is a great progression for me.

I believe in working to promote and preserve our countryside for its many uses and as a valuable resource, so am interested in the many aspects like recreation, nature and agriculture associated with the landscape. Promoting the landscape, which I will also be doing on this placement, is important to me because through education and awareness-raising, principles can be properly upheld.

My background includes horses, farming and healthcare so I have understanding of different interests and needs involved. My research I did for my degrees also demonstrate the importance of natural cover and features that can moderate some climate change impacts on nature reserves and farmland, which also support other benefits like providing larger areas of vegetation for wildlife movement. I am thrilled to continue to work for a landscape that is local to me and with local communities, which will create a healthier place for its people and wildlife that can last into the future. I hope to gain work experience and to learn more, so I can continue to help improve and maintain places for us to live in and work with. I really appreciate the washes’ extensive grasslands with its opportunities and uses like flood storage and grazing, and interesting features that catch the eye and increase the value of land conservation.

Cattle at Mepal

Cattle grazing along the Washes at Mepal – image by Pete Johnstone for Cambridgeshire ACRE

Sutton 1

Flood water contained away from houses at Sutton Gault – image by Pete Johnstone for Cambridgeshire ACRE

Me and my Irish cob enjoy the farmland and its tracks, tree lines, copses, ditches and hedgerows where we see plenty of wildlife. One of our favourite rides is an old railway track that now serves as a byway lined by trees – see more about this in another blog! Travelling between towns and villages brings me to great views and features of the Fenland countryside and to appreciate its valuable food production role alongside the retained natural features that could be enhanced. I like to see and encourage use of these multifunctional lands and natural resourses by various people like cyclists, dog walkers and fishermen and many local businesses and activities that support the economy and society.

I actively work for the bigger picture of integrated, multi-beneficial and sustainable land uses that work with the wider landscape and enable wildlife to thrive and people to lead healthier lives, which I experience personally and understand academically.