HLF: come to Fens Funding session in Chatteris on 20th

LogosHeritage Lottery Fund (HLF) will be at Age UK, Chatteris on Thursday 20 February.

Find out about HFL funding options for your project ideas

You can book a session to find out about the funding we have available, our application process and discuss any project ideas you may have.

What projects does HLF fund?

HLF funds a broad range of activities that help people of all ages explore their heritage together. These can range from small scale events, exhibitions and workshops to larger projects that include training, volunteering, conservation and restoration.

Heritage means many things to different people.  Heritage Lottery funds projects from £3,000 upwards, for activities that include:

  • Exploring histories of individuals, communities, places, events and historic anniversaries
  • First World War
  • natural habitats and species
  • community archaeology
  • collections of items, archives or other materials
  • industrial, maritime and transport history
  • historic buildings and structures, including listed places of worship

How do I book a session?

To book a one to one advice session, please phone Rachel Fuller on 01223 224880.

 This event is supported by Cambridge CVS http://www.cambridgecvs.org.uk

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Come and talk to the Heritage Lottery Fund

Funding advice from HLF in Huntingdon

Heritage Lottery Fund will be at Hunts Forum on Friday 24 January from 11am to 4pm.  You can book a session to find out about the funding they have available, application processes and discuss any project ideas you may have.

What do they fund?

HLF funds a broad range of activities that help people of all ages explore their heritage together. These can range from small scale events, exhibitions and workshops to larger projects that include training, volunteering, conservation and restoration

Heritage means many things to different people.  Heritage Lottery funds activities that include:

  • exploring histories of individuals, communities, places, events and historic anniversaries
  • First World War
  • natural habitats and species
  • community archaeology
  • collections of items, archives or other materials
  • industrial, maritime and transport history
  • historic buildings and structures, including listed places of worship

Programmes fund projects from £3,000 to several million.

 How do you book a session?

To book a one to one advice session, please phone Rachel Fuller on 01223 224880.

This event is supported by Hunts Forum: www.huntsforum.org.uk

HLF funding advice in Wisbech

Heritage Lottery Fund will be at the Ferry Project, South Brink, Wisbech PE13 1JQ on Thursday 19 December with Cambridgeshire CVS.  You can book a session to discuss your project idea and get advice on the application process.

 What do they fund?

HLF funds a broad range of activities that help people of all ages explore their heritage together. These can range from small scale events, exhibitions and workshops to larger projects that include training, volunteering, conservation and restoration.

Heritage means many things to different people.  Heritage Lottery funds activities that include

  • exploring histories of individuals, communities, places, events and historic anniversary
  • First World War
  • natural habitats and species
  • community archaeology
  • collections of items, archives or other materials
  • industrial, maritime and transport history
  • historic buildings and structures

To book a one to one advice session, please phone Rachel Fuller on 01223 224880.  Appointments are currently available from 10am to 3pm.

This event is organised by Cambridge CVS: www.cambridgecvs.org.uk

Our Stage 2 Application is in!

Heritage Lottery FundOWLP logo

 

 

 

 

Stage 2 submission is in

We have done it! It has, undeniably, been hard work, but the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership has managed to get all the necessary paperwork together for its stage 2 submission to the Heritage Lottery Fund. I had the great pleasure to personally hand in a full three files of paperwork at the HLF’s East of England’s regional office, yesterday afternoon.

Yesterday was also our deadline for submission, to ensure a 1 April 2014 start for our delivery phase.

Thanks ever so much to everyone who has helped over the last 11 months to get to this stage!

Our submission included the partnership’s Landscape Conservation Action Plan (>400 pages), all five commissioned research reports, and a whole series of supporting documents (which includes such things as a partnership agreement, budget and cash flows, job specs, timetable, consents).

What happens next?

The Heritage Lottery Fund will assess our application and let us know in March 2014 whether the remainder of the earmarked budget (£905,700) will be released to the partnership. We believe we are in a very good position, but unfortunately will have to wait a while before we know for certain.

Although the partnership’s projects for the delivery in 2014 – 2017 have now been worked out in full and in great detail, there is still some work that needs doing in the next few months, before we can actually start doing things on the ground; this includes further promotion work, writing briefs for e.g. our website, liaison with partners and related projects and initiatives and recruiting extra staff.

I will also use this intermediate period to continue keeping you informed of further developments, and provide you with more information about what the partnership will actually do next year – so, do keep an eye out for further blog posts.

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Lock keeper cottage at Welches Dam (Manea parish)

Other Landscape Partnership schemes in East Anglia

Heritage Lottery Fund

Including the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership (OWLP), there are currently four Landscape Partnership schemes in the East of England. They are:

  • Managing a Masterpiece (Stour Valley; completed : summer 2013)
  • Touching the Tide (Suffolk Coast; started delivery phase this spring)
  • Breaking New Ground (The Brecks; in development phase)
  • Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership

As there are synergies with what the OWLP scheme is trying to achieve, I thought it would be interesting to show what else is happening in the region. Over the last few months the central OWLP team has also been in regular contact with staff at the Breaking New Ground and Touching the Tide schemes, who have been very helpful with information exchange.

Each of the landscape Partnerships are very different in the type of landscapes it focuses on, ranging from the coastal landscape of the Touching the Tide, the dry scrubland of the Brecks, to the flood plain and Fenlands of the Ouse Washes, area. The Managing a Masterpiece manages the landscape as fabulously painted by John Constable who painted the old building and waterways of this landscapes. All have had a different story to tell; with the funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund each of the landscapes are brought back to life, with the involvement and help of the local communities and business.

Map of the existing Landscape Partnership schemes within East Anglia:

Map of existing Landscape Partnership in East Anglia

Map of existing Landscape Partnership in East Anglia

The Brecks

Breaking New Ground covers 1000 square kilometres in the Brecks, in the heart of East Anglia.

The climate here is semi-continental, which means that the weather is colder than the UK average during winter and hotter in summer. The Brecks can also experience extreme changes in temperature throughout the year with the possibility of frost during almost any month, which in conjunction with the low rainfall in East Anglia makes it the driest part of the UK.

The Brecks have nutrient poor soil however it is a good habitat for rabbits and there are ancient Pingos, formed at the end of the last Ice Age; these are not common across the UK as most have been built on or removed. The resulting Pingo ponds are home to some unique species of wildlife, many of which are rare and some of the beetles have survived here since the last Ice Age.

Brecks Landscape Source: www.brecks.org

Brecks Landscape Source: http://www.brecks.org

In the 1660s, the area experienced huge sandstorms what with the area being largely made up of sandy soils. As a result, sand dunes were formed on Lakenheath Warren in the 1660s. These were spread over a thousand acres and the sand was blown as far as Santon Downham and partially buried villages and blocked the Little Ouse River. Extensive planting of trees in the area has stopped sandstorms occurring. The last mobile sand dune system can be seen at Wangford Warren Nature Reserve.

The Brecks has the potential to support over 300 tourist-related business, however it is one of East Anglia’s hidden gems: it is obscured by trees, resulting in rail and car travellers passing by, generally not knowing what lies behind the line of trees en route to more well-know areas such as the Norfolk Coast and the Broads. The area behind the trees, nevertheless, is a world of forest adventure; miles of tracks and paths forming a great attraction with an amazing fun world of history for everyone to get involved in.

In late July 2013 The Brecks Partnership and Greater Anglia put an image of The Brecks on the side of a train travelling between Cambridge and Norwich, as this is the line which passes through the Brecks. The aim was to promote the area to a wider audience and the train will be running until the end of July 2014 promoting the Brecks along the way.

Train with the The Brecks logo  Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sinkplunger/9730654292/

Train with the The Brecks logo. Would this also be an idea for Ouse Washes LP area, another hidden gem in the region – what do you think?
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sinkplunger/9730654292/

 

Touching the Tide

The Touching the Tide Landscape Partnership scheme is within the Suffolk Coast & Heaths AONB area and is situated along the Suffolk Coast between Covehithe and Felixstowe.

The development phase was completed in November 2012 and funding was given to go forward with the delivery phase. The Touching the Tide Landscape Partnership has received £900k to support the 3 year project which started in spring 2013 and is due to end in spring 2016.

The scheme intents to invest in skills, businesses and the environment. The project money will be used to restore and conserve heritage assets which make the coast special, for example the Martello Towers as well as the shingle beaches which contribute to the sense of wildness that people value in the character of the landscape. The funding will also be used to work with local communities to inspire them to share stories of the area’s history to younger members of the community, as well as helping to conserve the local heritage by working with art projects and archaeological digs. All these projects encourage the local community to work together and to feel proud of their heritage. By the end of the 3 year project the aim is to have made a real difference to people’s understanding of this very dynamic coastline, so they can help in shaping its future.

Managing a Masterpiece

The Managing a Masterpiece Landscape Partnership scheme focused on the Stour Valley; it started in 2010 and ended in summer 2013. Their Vision is for a landscape cared for and celebrated by the local community, having been provided with knowledge, skills and opportunities needed to manage and enjoy it. The area has inspired generations of artists such as John Constable because of it natural beauty and historic structures, riverside trees, rich heritage of meadows and the field boundaries.

managing a masterpiece

The objectives for Managing a Masterpiece were:

  • Understanding the historic evolution of the landscape and the way traditional land management has shaped it;
  • Conserving or restoring the manmade and natural features that create the historic character of the landscape;
  • Celebrating the cultural associations and activities of the landscape area;
  • Encouraging more people to access, learn about, become involved in and make decisions about their landscape heritage;
  • Improving understanding of local craft and other skills by providing training opportunities.

There were 7 overarching projects (each with further projects within) which formed the Managing a Masterpiece Landscape Partnership scheme, all of which explored different parts of the landscape and which focused on:  Landscape lessons; Historic Landscape Study; Building History; Slimy Posts and Brickwork; Hidden History; Stripping Back the Layers; and Medieval Masterpieces. Each of the projects were carried out by local communities: the more they contributed the more they appreciated its value and wanted to continue their involvement with the local heritage after funding stopped.

During the years of the Landscape Partnership over 3,500 volunteer working days were completed throughout all of the projects, half of which were carried out during several archaeological projects.

Landscape of Managing a Masterpieces Source; http://www.managingamasterpiece.org/

Landscape of Managing a Masterpieces Source; http://www.managingamasterpiece.org/

 

Legacy of the Landscape Partnership schemes in the region

All of the above Landscape Partnerships schemes are aimed at involving people in their local heritage and landscape and providing access to the area so that more people are able to enjoy the environment in which they live, while at the same time giving the project volunteers the opportunity to learn new skills. The Landscape Partnership schemes do not finish once the funding stops as it is hoped that after 3 years of funding people are more knowledgeable and inspired about the area and will continue to look after the environment in which they live.

At the Ouse Washes Conference at the beginning of September there were some inspiring comments showing that people want to continue the project work after the end of the 3 years of HLF support. One person commented “My enthusiasm has grown after today. Think about branding of the scheme and of a sustainable legacy” with another saying, “Overall an exciting project- Wish it was longer than 3 years”. The Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership scheme certainly aims to get more people interested, excited and proud of their local heritage and support people in looking after the Ouse Washes into the future once the 3 year project is finished.

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Stories from the Horseman’s Mouth

Heritage Lottery FundIn terms of heritage, it is all happening in Littleport! Recently, I reported on the now completed HLF-funded project which resulted in the documentation of the remarkably well-preserved Family Adams shop in Littleport – see here for the previous blog post on this.

The shop window at the old Family Adams shop currently displays images, artefacts and information for a new local project: ‘The Horseman’s Word’, which aims to research the golden age of the Fenland Heavy Horse. Recently, the Heritage Lottery Fund awarded a grant to the Field Theatre Group in Littleport to carry out this project.

The Field Theatre Group’s project ‘The Horseman’s Word’ will bring together a range of people, researchers, archivists, historians, film makers, curators, photographers and heavy horse experts. In this, the Field Theatre Group will work closely with ADeC over the next 18 months to deliver this exciting new project. ADeC is also a key partner in the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership scheme. The Field Theatre group’s project has clear links to the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership scheme.

HMW Outside the Bull Public House junction Wisbech Rd and Camel rd

2 men and cart, outside the Black Bull, Wisbech Road, Littleport. Image courtesy of the Littleport Society.

The Fenland area has a rich heritage related to horses and horse keeping; heavy horses in particular have helped shape the land as we experience around us now.

horesmans-postcard-wright

Saddlery, Main St, Littleport, 1912 Image courtesy of the Littleport Society.

The project aims to shine a light on the unique relationships between horses and Fen Folk, also uncovering myths, folklore and magic associated with the horses. the project focuses on ‘the golden age’ of  the heavy horse between c1850 and 1950.

A series of community history gathering workshops will be held in Ely (20 & 27 July), Wisbech (29 June and 13 July) and Prickwillow over the next couple of months. Do come along and share your stories and artefacts; they may well find their way into the documentary DVD, touring exhibition and online archive which will be created as part of the project.

Find out more about the community workshops here:

final flyer cover HMW

The official launch of the Horseman’s Word project is coming Saturday, 1 June, 2-5 pm, in Littleport Village Hall. There you can meet the project team and be entertained with songs and stories from the golden age of the Fenland Heavy Horsemen. Find out more about this event here.

The Field Theatre Group has got very good experience in community projects. One of their previous projects, Common Grounds, resulted in film showing a range of stories, focusing on land workers and Fenland life at the turn of the last century. Another interesting production was Landlines, the Field Theatre Group’s multi-media touring production, incorporating actors, film footage, music, poetry and songs to bring to life the Fen landscape, its people and places. Learn more about the work of the Field Theatre Group here.

Want to know more about ‘The Horseman’s Word’? Click on the below image, which is taken from the Horseman’s Word’s flyer:

final inside flyer jpag

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