Time of day

Lovely images from Bill Blake of the Earith Civil War Bulwark – captured – through kite aerial photography – as part of the work he does for the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership scheme including for the Cambridge Archaeological Unit’s project to take place around this location in a month or so.

Billboyheritagesurvey's Blog

I’m shooting an earthwork monument for photogrammetry, and its taken months of patient work by the team at OWLP to get all the required consents, so as soon as I got the email from Natural England confirming permission and the cloud cleared, off I went, got there at 10am and flew for an hour.

18082014 mosaic _01

The results were disappointing, sure I got the cover, but this is a pale ghost of what I know to be there: most of the features I wanted to record were almost invisible. I returned on the same day at 6pm and tried to repeat the path. What a difference! Low light is much better than overhead. I knew this of course but had hoped the 10am shoot would have been just enough before noon to be effective. In August at this latitude it’s just not the case.

Time of day

Left:10am right 6pm

On the return that evening…

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This entry was posted in Archaeology, Delivery Phase, Heritage, History, Photography, Projects-Community Participation, Projects-Conservation, Projects-Training, Theme 2-Hidden Heritage by markatousewasheslps. Bookmark the permalink.

About markatousewasheslps

Programme Manager for the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership scheme, leading on the 1-year development and 3-year delivery phases of the Heritage Lottery Fund grant-aided Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership (OWLP) scheme, on behalf of and in close cooperation with a wide range of local, regional and national partner organisations. The Ouse Washes LP centres around a portfolio of projects which focus on: conservation works to historic and natural environmental assets; improving community participation & engagement with the landscape and its heritage; increasing access and learning opportunities; and providing more opportunities for training in traditional land management skills. The overall aim is to leave a long-term legacy for this fascinating and unique landscape, in the process creating tangible improvements to social, economic and environmental aspects of this landscape, its heritage and communities. Find out more about the landscape, the aims of the project and the partnership by following our: Blog, https://ousewasheslps.wordpress.com/ Twitter: @ousewasheslp