Circular Walks in OWLP area – part 2 : Manea

Series of circular walks and ridesLogos

So here it is, the second instalment of the series of circular walks and rides! Following on from Mark’s excellent first blog of the series all about a circular walk in Mepal, this second entry in the series looks at a walk which starts and finishes in Manea.

Manea

Manea is a village which is found at about the half way point along the Landscape Partnership area, and it is a place with a surprising amount of history; for example Charles I had designs to build a new Capital City here (although, it has to be said, it was never built!). Welches Dam, just outside Manea, was also host to another Fenland oddity: The Floating Church, which used to travel the Fenland waterways offering religious services to local communities. It was moored at Welches Dam for two years from 1904. And then there are the fantastic stories surrounding the 19th century utopian Manea Colony.

The Walk

As always with Fenland walks, this one gives you the opportunity to experience the traditional Fen landscape with its massive skies and flat horizons.

Distance 6.3 miles (10.1km); Minimum time 3hrs; Ascent/gradient Negligible; Level of difficulty Medium; Paths Lanes and hard farm tracks; Landscape Wide, flat fields separated by ditches and drainage channels; Suggested map aqua3 OS Explorer 228 March & Ely. (All information and detailed description of the walk can be found on the AA Website from which the map below is taken).

As an alternative at point 3 on the map, you can turn left to take you along the route of the former light railway used to transport earthwork reinforcements to the flood banks of the Old Bedford River. All the details of this walk can be found by following this link to the AA website.

Alternatives

There are several footpaths in and around Manea (as you can see on the map below) so it is quite possible to find your own circular walk. Be warned though, some footpaths marked on the map may be closed for part of the year (during the bird breeding season),

Manea map showing the position of Interpretation Panels.

Manea map showing the position of Interpretation Panels. Source: Cambridgeshire County Council Rural Group

although you should always be able to find an alternative route if you find you are confronted by a shut gate!

A copy of this map is available to download from here.

This map also has marked on it the position of some interpretation panels which will be installed as part of the Manea Community Conservation Project, which is one of the projects of this Landscape Partnership Scheme. (You can see all the partners and link through to their websites on the OWLP Partnership page.) These interpretation panels have been deliberately placed along the route that is taken by the local children between the school and The Pit.

I hope that this blog will inspire some people to take the opportunity to visit Manea and take a stroll through its local countryside. It’s certainly inspired me – keep an eye out for updates to this post with pictures from my trip.

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This entry was posted in Access, Area descriptions, Communities, Delivery Phase, Heritage, Projects, Projects-Access & Learning, Theme 2-Hidden Heritage and tagged , , , , , by jonoatousewashes. Bookmark the permalink.

About jonoatousewashes

Programme Support Officer for the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership (OWLP) scheme. I will be supporting the 3-year delivery phase of the Heritage Lottery Fund grant-aided scheme which is run in close cooperation with a wide range of local, regional and national partner organisations. The various OWLP projects focus on: conservation works to historic and natural environmental assets; improving community participation & engagement with the landscape and its heritage; increasing access and learning opportunities; and providing more opportunities for training in traditional land management skills. The overall aim is to leave a long-term legacy for this fascinating and unique landscape, in the process creating tangible improvements to social, economic and environmental aspects of this landscape, its heritage and communities. Find out more about the landscape, the aims of the project and the partnership by following our: Blog, https://ousewasheslps.wordpress.com/ Twitter: @ousewasheslp