Ouse Washes now also on Twitter

Heritage Lottery FundFollowing on from my last post, setting out our Communications Strategy, we are now also expanding our exposure through the Social Media: we are now also on Twitter.

We just created a Twitter account for the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership Scheme. It’s @ousewasheslps if you wish to follow – see also the quick link to the right.

As the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership is still in its development phase, with most of the work not starting until 2014, we will probably not send out many Tweets of our own just yet.

Nevertheless, there are already many good and exciting activities and events happening within the area we cover, often organised by our partners in the scheme; we are keen to give these more coverage by retweeting useful information. So, if you have an event or such going, we are keen to hear about it.

Internet connection

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This entry was posted in Access, Communication, Communities, OWLP Strategy and tagged , , , by markatousewasheslps. Bookmark the permalink.

About markatousewasheslps

I am currently coordinating a partnership-led bid to the Heritage Lottery Fund (for a circa £600K Heritage Grant bid) focusing on strengthening the unique yet vulnerable natural heritage in the Cambridgeshire Fens surrounding the Old west River, the new 'New Life on the Old West' project. Until recently I was the Programme Manager for the Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership scheme, leading on the 1-year development and 3-year delivery phases of the Heritage Lottery Fund grant-aided Ouse Washes Landscape Partnership (OWLP) scheme (from Dec 2012 until March 2017), on behalf of and in close cooperation with a wide range of local, regional and national partner organisations. The Ouse Washes LP's portfolio of 51 projects have focused on: conservation works to historic and natural environmental assets; improving community participation & engagement with the landscape and its heritage; increasing access and learning opportunities; and providing more opportunities for training in traditional land management skills. The overall aim has been to leave a long-term legacy for this fascinating and unique landscape, in the process creating tangible improvements to social, economic and environmental aspects of this landscape, its heritage and communities.